How encrypted email works

I’ve been working on the Direct Project for the past year or more. The Direct Project is a federally sponsored initiative that uses secure email as the foundation for the ubiquitous nationwide exchange of health information.

To secure an email, you have to, among other things, encrypt the message content. It is no surprise that many newcomers to Direct want to know how encrypted email works. Others, who are comfortable with classic message security, notice that unlike point to point messaging (one sender, one receiver), email is inherently multicast (one sender, many receivers). They ask: how do you encrypt email sent to multiple recipients?

In this inaugural posting for my new blog, I will try to answer both questions in plain English.

Encryption Basics

First, a quick refresher on encryption concepts:

  1. Key: An array of carefully generated bits, used to encrypt and decrypt data.
  2. Encryption: You use a key (secret) and a precise series of complicated steps (encryption algorithm or cipher) to mangle (encrypt) data into undecipherable gibberish.
  3. Decryption: You use a key (secret – hopefully the right one) and a precise series of complicated steps (decryption algorithm or cipher) to un-mangle (decrypt) gibberish back into your original data. If you use the wrong key, or the wrong algorithm, you turn the source gibberish into more gibberish.
  4. Symmetric Encryption: You use the same key to both encrypt and decrypt the data. Both the sender and the receiver have a copy of the same keya shared secret. To share the secret, the sender and receiver must exchange their shared key securely – without an attacker getting a peek. If an attacker can somehow (silently) intercept an inadequately protected secret as it moves from sender to receiver (steaming open the envelope, so to speak), the attacker can also decrypt your encrypted data.
  5. Asymmetric Encryption: You use one key (public) to encrypt the data and an associated but different key (private) to decrypt the data. Data encrypted with your public key can only be decrypted with your associated private key. You boldly give the public part of your key pair to anybody you want to receive encrypted data from. You keep your private key secret and and use it to decrypt data that people send you. Unlike symmetric encryption, there is no shared secret to exchange. You can distribute your public key to the entire world without fear. Data encrypted with your public key is truly for your eyes only – because only you can decrypt it with the secret private key that only you have.The reverse is also true. Data encrypted with your private key can only be decrypted using your public key. This property has important implications for digital signatures (more in future posts).

Symmetric and Asymmetric encryption work differently, – they use different types of keys and different encryption/decryption algorithms.

Symmetric encryption is fast. Asymmetric encryption is slow.

How does email encryption work?

Violet wants people to encrypt the email they send her. To help them do this, Violet creates a (public, private) key pair. She wraps up her public key in a secure package called an X509 Digital Certificate (more on this in future posts) and gives the certificate containing the public key to those she is corresponding with. To make it easy for others to find her public key, she even publishes her certificate in a public directory.

Violet’s good friend Toby Toby decides to send her some encrypted email.

All Toby has to do is use Violet’s public key to encrypt the message, right? Wrong.

To use Violet’s public key to encrypt his email, Toby must use asymmetric encryption. Which, unfortunately, is slow. Toby cannot practically encrypt the content of his email using Violet’s asymmetric public key – it takes too much work!

To encrypt his email content, Toby needs a faster option – symmetric encryption. Toby generates a new symmetric encryption key and uses this key to efficiently encrypt the content of his email.

But how does Violet decrypt Toby’s email? To decrypt, Violet needs a copy of the symmetric encryption key, which she doesn’t have because Toby generated it on the fly and hasn’t given it to her yet! How does Toby securely send Violet a copy of his encryption key?

Toby cleverly solves the problem by attaching the encryption key to the email itself. The message brings its own key with it.

But isn’t that crazy? Anybody can now grab the key and decrypt the email, right? Wrong.

The clever Toby encrypts the symmetric encryption key before attaching it to the email. He does this using Violet’s public key, which he had obtained earlier. And even though this requires slow asymmetric encryption, the performance conscious Toby doesn’t mind because the encryption key is relatively small – usually only 256 bits long at most.

Toby sends his email to Violet. Naturally, Toby does not encrypt the addressing information on the message – the To & From – which have to travel in the clear, just like the addressing information on the envelope of a sealed snail-mail letter. Email servers use the addressing information to transport the email to its destination.

When Violet receives the email, she decrypts the attached encryption key using her private key. She then uses the encryption key to decrypt the email content and receives Toby’s friendly missive.

How do you encrypt email sent to multiple recipients?

Toby wants to send an email message to both Violet and Margaret. How does he encrypt this message?

Should Toby repeat the encryption process twice? Encrypt the email once for Violet and again for Margaret? And what happens if Toby also puts Gitanjali on the To line? Does Toby have to encrypt the message three times? And send out 3 different copies of the same message? Isn’t that getting really inefficient?

Toby has a much better idea. Just like before, he encrypts the email exactly once, using a symmetric encryption key. Then he attaches multiple copies of the same encryption key to the message – one for each recipient and encrypted with that recipient’s public key. Toby encrypts one copy of the encryption key with Violet’s public key. He encrypts a second copy with Margaret’s public key and third with Gitanjali’s. Then he attaches the 3 copies to the message.

When Margaret receives the email, she locates the copy of the encryption key that was intended for her. She decrypts the encryption key, then uses it to decrypt Toby’s note. Violet and Gitanjali do the same.

You can use the same technique to encrypt email sent to as many recipients as you like. Every new recipient merely means the small overhead of an additional attached copy of the encryption key.

S/MIME

You should now have a high level notion of how email encryption works. Those of you who are interested in the gory details should deep dive into S/MIMEthe defacto standard for securing email. Please do peruse the S/MIME and Direct Transport specs for a bit by bit commentary.

It takes more than encryption to secure email. See my follow up posts to learn how:

Source Code

The open source Direct Project Reference implementation contains a full S/MIME and secure email implementation. To learn how to encrypt and sign email and email content in C#, check out the SMIME source code.

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